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CNN
Dec 4, 2013 3:30pm PST
have a predictable regulatory environment. we do a good job of educating the kids. we have a good tax break. we're doing all the things -- >> it sounds like you're agreeing with the pope then? >> you look at the result, we have less disparity in the income that can most any other state. we would love to have the pope. he can come to provo anytime. >> you have a deep and personal passion about helping the poor, and i suspect you resonated deeply with pope francis ooze comments which were very powerful and compelling in many ways, but i'm puzzled. wise in the last 30 years we've had dramatic economic growth. i was very fortunate i was there with reagan and with clinton. in the case of the clinton administration when we worked with them, from 1993 to 200, one of the very four people of poverty left poverty, and huge economic growth. about 3 1/2, 4 million people, xw a million and a half people, lost their jobs. why is it so hard to look at the things that have work. try to find a way and say, which of these pieces really worked. find out what are their patterns? and how can we replicate
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 6:30am PST
powerful military, but the best education system? not so much. the survey compares thousands of reports from around the world. u.s. students are average in reading and science, below average in math. the u.s. came in 36 out of 65 developed countries between the slovak republican and lithuania. students in shanghai are more than two years ahead of the peers in massachusetts. the u.s. did better in reading, 24th in the world rankings. number one, shanghai again. science, the u.s. came in number 28 on that list. the top performer? you guessed it. shanghai, china. the u.s. will not get the most improved award. the u.s. fell in all three subjects from 2009 to 2012. u.s. education secretary arne duncan says it points a picture of education stagnation. is the u.s. falling behind or is everyone else getting better? i sat down with candy crowley and christiane amanpour and asked why the u.s. is falling behind. >> what is the problem with education? we keep throwing money at it. the interesting statistics are that the u.s. spends a huge amount of money on education, it doesn't spend as much as ot
CNN
Dec 3, 2013 7:00pm PST
to education in a test given to 15-year-olds around the entire world, american students were far below average in math and only about average in science and reading. the top five scores in each subject were from shanghai, china, singapore, hong kong, tie wand and south korea. way down in 36th place, the united states. now with our panel christiane amanpour, jeffrey toobin, amy holmes and phil harper author of "letters ton in cars rated brother" and star of usa network's "covert affairs." what do you make of the study? >> it apparently has happened over the last 30 years. we used to be number one, number one in college graduates, number one in math and science. and what popped out to me in the study is the disparity of how much in shanghai which is number one, how competitive it is to get a job as a teacher, how height salaries are. that it's considered a great job. >> same in finland. like the top 10% of graduates get the jobs as teachers. that's not the case here. >> very respected job. >> right and rewarded as well. which is obviously also an issue sometimes. although it seems in the united
CNN
Dec 3, 2013 10:00pm PST
card when it comes to the education your kids may be getting here in the united states. when you see how poorly american students do compared to the rest of the world in a new test, you might have tough questions for educators. >>> new details in the "fast and furious crash" the car in question, 600 horses, incredibly quick reflexes and potentially deadly if pushed too far. la's known definitely for its traffic, congestion, for the smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the buses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution into the air. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. yeah... try new alka seltzer fruit chews. they work fast on heartburn and taste awesome. these are good. told ya! i'm
CNN
Dec 3, 2013 5:00pm PST
hash tag "ac 360." >>> next, grim report card when it comes to the education your kids may be getting here in the united states. when you see how poorly american students do compared to the rest of the world in a new test, you might have tough questions for educators. >>> new details in the "fast and furious crash" the car in question, 600 horses, incredibly quick reflexes and potentially deadly if pushed too far. people don't have to think about where their electricity comes from. they flip the switch-- and the light comes on. it's our job to make sure that it does. using natural gas this power plant can produce enough energy for about 600,000 homes. generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions-- it matters. ♪ is what makes us different. we take the time to get to know you and your unique health needs. then we help create a personalized healthcare experience that works for you. and you. and you. with 50 years of know-how, and a dedicated network of doctors, health coaches, and wellness experts, we're a partner you can rely on -- today, and tomorrow. we'r
CNN
Dec 4, 2013 9:00am PST
education. >> when michele, the daughter of a shift worker at a water plant and a secretary wanted to go to college, just like me, this country helped us afford it. until we could pay it back. so what drives me is a grandson, a son, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving, hard-working optimistic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> and many will probably remember that the president and the first lady have been very open about it took so many years to pay off those loans, there's 40 years old before finally paying off the loans. let's talk to jim acosta with more on the president's message about affording education, the disparity of economics in this corrupt, et cetera, et cetera. >> sure. hi, guys. a couple of things were going on there. the president's message, let's talk about that for a few moments. he was talking about income disparity, income inequality and he laid out some markers for things he would like to see the congress pass, some things that by the way the congress is not likely to pass because it's so deeply divide
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 1:00pm PST
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. kand i don't have time foris morunreliable companies.b angie's list definitely saves me time and money. for over 18 years we've helped people take care of the things that matter most. join today. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and rebuild. for companies going from garage to global. on the ground, in the air, even into space. we repaid every dollar america lent us. and gave america back a profit. we're here to keep our promises. to help you realize a better tomorrow. from the families of aig, happy holidays. >>> welcome back to "the lead." he showed the world the true meaning of resilience and during 27 years as a prisoner in his native south africa, emerging from that torment to become his country's first black president, leading his people out of the ugliness that was apartheid. we are today remembering the remarkable life of nelson m
CNN
Dec 9, 2013 9:00am PST
, whether it's a much bigger or more inclusive middle class including blacks, whether it's better education, but you're absolutely right. the project is not finished. in fact, even particularly amongst the blacks, there is a massive income inequality, one of the biggest in the world. very, very poor people still living in shantytowns and the like while there is also at the same time a very rich and exploding black you know, economic super class. so that is an issue. the issue of corruption is still one that's alive and needs to be tackled. and the issue of education still needs to be tackled. he was very keen on the idea of education. but look, many people will say some of the very important things were not done. and they still have to be finished, but after mandela was released and after those first elections in south africa, so much more of this continent has become democratic. it's not a coincidence. >> christiane, so many world leaders when you talk about the leader of cuba, the united states and europe and african countries, it could not be more diverse. do you think there is a lesson,
CNN
Dec 1, 2013 10:00pm PST
with a psoriasis patient advocate from abbvie for free one-to one education and support. sign up at psoriasis.com, and talk to your dermatologist. is a really big deal.u with aches, fever and chills- there's no such thing as a little flu. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so call your doctor right away. tamiflu treats the flu in people 2 weeks and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing, have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking tamiflu and call your doctor immediately. children and adolescents in particular may be at an increased risk of seizures, confusion or abnormal behavior. the most common side effects are mild to moderate nausea and vomiting. so don't wait. attack the flu virus at its source. ask your doctor about tamiflu, prescription for flu. >>> my name is
CNN
Dec 2, 2013 3:30pm PST
.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ] aflac. [ sassily ] aflac. uh huh. [ under his breath ] i am so fired. you're on in 5, duck. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash. find out more at aflac.com. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash. on the table by not choosing the right medicare d plan. no one could have
CNN
Dec 4, 2013 1:00pm PST
and the courage of those educators who were on the speed of what happened. >> i went to president to newtown, and the grief was tangible. it was a physical thing you could feel. it is difficult to talk about even right now. in the last few weeks, there was an information, there was haunting details from the shooter who was clearly a young man suffering from sight mental health issues, and yet his mother, nancy lanza kept weapons in the house, took her son to the shooting range, she even planned to buy him a gun for christmas last year. she says, quote, you would want treatment for someone like that. he was isolated from everyone but his mother, and she did not have the understanding. i know it is sensitive because she is the one that he killed that day, but is that mother correct? should nancy lanza have stepped up more? >> nancy lanza probably needed help herself. and it certainly, as a parent, of four children, i can speak eternally about the challenges of parenting. not in this kind of situation, but easy to say in hindsight what she should have done. the point is what society should have
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm PST
day of school as was very common under the british education system there. his real name is rolala. >> he went to a methodist school and everyone was given english names -- >> which means -- >> which means it's the branch of a tree -- shaking the branch of a tree but the meaning is troublemaker. >> i love that. >> it's so -- >> that was his birth name, troublemaker was extraordinary. >> when i started working with him, i never, ever heard anyone call him nelson. at the same time, he wasn't president yet. i heard people use his clan name modiba. it shows his background and it's paternal and just stuck. so that's -- everybody called him modiba. >> the courage it took in the 50s, the '60s, this regime that attempted to have absolute control. it's hard i think for anybody who didn't live through those times to understand what this took to oppose and ultimately over throw this regime. >> i didn't live it either. the list of not indignities but the appalling facts of separate life were just -- you cannot believe this happened. i mean, you saw it all, whites and blacks -- >> tremendous, t
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 1:00am PST
-old university student said had mandela had not made those choices he would not be getting the education he is getting. so many people calling and commenting on how if mandela had not been the man that he was, this country could have very easily ended up like syria or iraq. another policeman we were speaking to this morning saying with nelson mandela's passing he felt he had lost a part of his soul and a part of his body and that he truly hopes moving forward the country and its leaders will remember what it was that this incredible man stood for. john? >> it is so remarkable. arwa damon, thank you. she brings up such a good point. words like legend don't begin to cut when twhen you deal with nelson mandela. when you're in south africa he is more than a leader and more than a legend. he's in the fabric of that nation and some one's sole they carry a piece of him around. >> a very interesting point given what we know is going on in the middle east now the connection she made the country could have ended you up differently if it wasn't for his sacrifices. >> no way inevitable there would not
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 5:00pm PST
access to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hossa. he started to see himself and how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. and i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being, and full of the idea that he was on a journey and he had something to do. he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there is an old spirit, an old song which is -- ♪ i'm on my journey now mount zion and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion ♪ he was on a journey and he knew it, and he had something to do, and this is what each of us has. if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey. i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, a south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. you said your husband and mandela were rivals but that didn't matter. tell us about that experience. >> their were rivals but when nelson mandela came to visit, he never
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 12:00am PST
back is what's called the peace plan, peace, equipped leaders, care for the poor, educate the sick. in the last year i sent 23,000 of my members to 196 countries to assist the poor, care for the sick, educate the next generation. those things get done by churches all the time. and so, to limit the church that you can only speak on this one area, i think it's nonsense. >> what about what he said about gays? he said this, if somebody is gay and seeks the law with goodwill, who am i to judge? this seemed a huge departure from anything i could have remembered any previous pope saying. it flies against what many catholics would say to themselves. you and i debated this before about gay rights, gay marriage, clearly a movement in america as there is around the world towards a much more toll rant attitude towards this. have you in the last two years, since i last i think debated this point with you, have you moved at all now? are you recognizing that there is this seemingly unstoppable movement? >> well, i don't get to change what god says is right and what god says is wrong. i think god
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 3:00pm PST
's covered by most health plans. >>> there's no question the world of education isn't what it used to be. ask anyone from teachers to parents, even students themselves. a new report by the american civil liberties union of pennsylvania looked at student discipline and whether the practice of zero tolerance is actually helping or hurting students and the verdict -- well, the overly broad policy just isn't working. and joining me to discuss is broward county public school superintendent robert brunsy, president of national school services committee and psychologist wendy walsh. >> tell us what zero tolerance is and why turn away from it now? >> well, the reason why we would turn away from it is because zero tolerance policies are not effective. in 2011 in broward county, we had the largest number of stude student school-related arrests in florida. 1,062. out of that 754 of them, about 75%, were for non-violent misdemeanor offenses. these are things that would normally have been handled by schools in the past and as we see the numbers continue to grow, they just put children on a trajectory that
CNN
Dec 8, 2013 7:00am PST
. the number of black children who get educate in the integrated schools is something like 10%. you look at the leadership zuma versus mandela. and it doesn't seem as if this were and upward trend. >> that's true and that discrepancy is true. but it's also true that the standard of living of black south africans has risen considerably since 1993, that the number of black south africans with electricity and clean drinking water and in the education system, all of it's gone up. south africa when you look at it from the outside, a glass half empty, glass half empty viewpoint. but i think what's really going to be interesting goi ing forwa is in a sense a kind of custody battle for brand mandela who claims them as their real symbol. and for mandela, symbolism was his stuff in trade. he realized that he was this astonishingly powerful symbol. a and across the world, we all want to claim him. all other countries want to claim mandela he represents our better selves in that sense. but within south africa, the question is he now a national symbol or to what extent the anc keeps him as their symb
CNN
Dec 8, 2013 10:00am PST
of black children who get educated in integrated schools is something like 10%. you know, you look at the leadership, zuma versus mandela, and you look around africa, it doesn't seem as though sun, you know, it doesn't seem this was an upward trend. >> that's true. that discrepancy is true, but it's also true that the standard of living of black south africans has risen. the number of black south africans with clean drinking water and in the education system has gone up. south africa has been a glass half empty glass half full thing that people tend to project upon south africa a lot of the prejudices with which they enter into the situation to begin with. but i think what's really going to be interesting going forward now is in a sense a kind of custody battle for brand mandela. who claims him as their real symbol, and more mandela symbolism was his stuff in trade. he realized he was an astonishingly powerful symbol. in a sense you can see across the world we all want to claim him. all other countries want to claim mandela. he represents our better selves. but within south africa
CNN
Dec 3, 2013 11:00am PST
for a country that spends more on education than anything else. it's a key test given to 15-year-olds in 65 countries. the u.s. ranks 36th in math. east asian countries top all three categories in science, the u.s. ranks 28th. only in reading are u.s. students really above average and still pretty much in the middle of the pack. shanghai takes every spot but they hardly represent all of china. it's a slim, slim look about the education system in china. the u.s. slipped in the rankings since 2009. scores are a little changed from the first report in 2000. what's wrong here? the report blames weak u.s. curriculum and education secretary arne duncan calls it a picture of educational stagnation. this is a reality at odds with aspirations to have the best educated work force in the world. he's pushing new common core standards in 45 states. a nationwide drive to standardize education hoping to stem the slide and reenergize american students. brooke? >> we roll on. i'm brooke baldwin here in new york with you today. news after an admission by the engineer at the controls of the speeding train tha
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 8:00am PST
to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hoso, he started to see himself and see how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being and full of the idea that he was on a journey, and he had something to do, he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there's an old spiritual, old gospel song which is i'm on my journey now, mount zion, on my journey now, mount zion, and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion, from my journey. mount zion. he was on the journey and he knew it and he had something to do. and this is what each of us has, if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey, i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. i understand your husband and mandela were something of rivals, but that didn't matter to mandela. tell us about that experienc
CNN
Dec 4, 2013 6:00pm PST
? >> no, she did not. she said her boys were fine, and that she was looking into education -- further education for adam. into washington, you know, they were waiting to hear back. no inclination anything was wrong or not right. >> i mean, obviously, it was a t tragedy for the family she lost her life, as well, that day but nothing can compel to the appalling horror suffers by other families. what do you as a member of the lanza family, what would you say to the families that lost their children that day and six adults killed? >> my heart goes out to each and every family that has lost a child. personally, i have lost two sons. i know what you feel. i know what you'll feel in five years from now, ten years from now. it's getting to that point of moving on from day to day, one foot in front of the other knowing that you will make it. you'll become stronger because of it. you'll never know why but you can't dwell on the bad times, fall on the good times. if you can reach out and help someone else in any way, that's part of the healing process and the ability to talk about it. if you don
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 4:00pm PST
was a smart man, a trained man, an educated man and he also stressed the need for that. you can't know what's right unless you know what's wrong. so you can't be in a position to demand what's right before you can criticize what's wrong. so he is staying on top of that. he also learned the best way to overcome your enemy is to be smarter. the best way to unite your forces is to be able to give credit where it belongs. he would say he served with me as well as in prison. steve, he did not to go prison because he was killed. but the sacrifices he made. so mandela was able to unite the forces of good wherever they were. whether it was in the other places, in the urban dwellings of johannesburg or capetown. he was able to speak to the high and the low. to let them know it was not just for a few but for all. and did he so not looking out for anything for himself but sharing with others. he is a moral for us, the likes of which we will have a very difficult time seeing a replacement any time soon. >> a lot of people are too young to remember the bitter debate in the 1990s about how to deal with s
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 7:00am PST
was absolutely passionate about education, and he had a great affinity with children, because remember, 27 years in prison, he hardly saw a child. and it was the one thing he said he really missed was the touch of a child. so he paid a lot of attention to the youth. and as you say, democracy here in south africa, the anniversary of those first democratic elections is next year, it was 20 years ago. so a lot of people, a lot of these people here didn't know apartheid, didn't know about the feel, the indignities of it, but they still know that nelson mandela made sacrifices for them. and the key is -- and he was very, very passionate about it -- he wanted his legacy to live on way after he had gone. and dethat he did that, "you ca like me in a small way. it's not hard to be nelson mandela. just pay attention to the people close to you and keep on trying hard and never give up." that in a way is his legacy. >> and they are living his legacy out. robin, thank you. appreciate it. >> reporter: okay. >>> one of the icons of new york honored nelson mandela last night. look at this. the top of the empire
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 10:00am PST
to put our children first and create situations in which we push not just the children but the educators that sur ound them. too many of us are comfortable with mediocrity. as michelle said, the rest of the world is moving forward. we haven't dropped, we're just losing in a race because we're not moving forward. >> frank talk from steve perry and michelle reed on this important issue. >>> we have much more ahead in the cnn newsroom and it all starts right now. i am fredricka whitfield. ice, sleet, snow, a cold snap hits much of the u.s., knocking out power for hundreds of thousands of people. and plunging central parts of the country into bone chilling cold. we're going live to the heart of the storm next. >>> and home at last after six weeks locked up in north korea, an elderly u.s. war veteran suddenly free. he is now back home. and we just heard from him last hour. >>> plus, after ineffective chemotherapy and failed bone marrow transplant, this 15-year-old leukemia patient thought he would die. then an experimental treatment changed everything. details coming up. >>> merrill newman ba
CNN
Dec 3, 2013 3:30pm PST
.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. >>> we're back with debby wasserman schultz and reince priebus. >> i want to set the stage. in a recent poll, 80% of the country distrusts washington and does not think washington makes the right decision on a regular basis. the country is clearly going to want to change. you are likely to nominate somebody who first became active in 1972 as a mcgovern field person who then became a national figure in 1992, which means that if you are under 42 years of age, you couldn't vote when her husband first ran. do you really think hillary clinton is the face of change the country will want to vote for in 2016? >> there's a reason that my counter part a few minutes ago said their party as a problem winning presidential elections. they are dramatically out of touch with most americans in the country. it is because even though he had a rebrand, it hasn't worked out so well. because just yesterday you could look at the things that the organizations did to alienate us african-americans, hispanics, i mean, jews an
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 1:30pm PST
city. what is his reputation? >> his methods are incorporated into almost every single educational program about prescribing opioids and even accepted by the fda. >> but if you start to ask around a bit, you'll learn that his reputation among some former patients and their families is astonishingly different. >> his reputation is he's known as dr. death. >> known as dr. death? >> yeah. >> that's how your wife's doctor was described? >> dr. death. >> multiple overdose deaths at the life tree pain clinic which webster ran for more than a decade now hover over him. >> he went unconscious. >> there are allegations of irresponsible prescribing practices and in the case of one patient, influencing what was written as the cause of death. >> here's the interesting part. >> roy bosley's wife carol ann first went to the life tree pain clinic in 2008. years earlier her car had been broadsided. >> she did not have the seat belt fastened and went through the windshield. >> after several operations on her spine, she managed her pain with low doses of painkillers. she's still functioning doing ev
CNN
Dec 8, 2013 11:00am PST
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. you give them the giggles. tylenol cold® helps relieve your worst cold and flu symptoms. but for everything we do, we know you do so much more. tylenol cold®. >>> a sheriff in south carolina refuses to lower the u.s. flag in honor of nelson mandela. sheriff clark has a reason. >> he said it should be reserved for american citizens. he said this honor should be reserved for american citizens. take a listen. >> show a sign of respect for what nelson mandela is doing. but in our country it should be the people. >> he went onto say that it should be lowered at the u.s. embassy and he is receiving overwhelming support. take a look at these fac
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 2:00pm PST
, meeting very educated, sophisticated, intelligent black people but who were living in horrible conditions and simply being disgusted coming from the united states watching what was going on in the 1980s and seeing the dramatic change that happened only a few years later in the early '90s. remind our viewers about what has changed in south africa over a relatively short span. >> reporter: well, it's nearly 20 years since democracy here, in 1994 when mandela became the first black president, and just remember, apartheid was a brutal regime but it was made up of lots, hundreds of petty little laws that all together created this racial monster so black people couldn't come into the towns to stay, to live. you know, there was a real sense of two separate nations. nelson mandela along with many of the anc and other political parties all created the environment by which this was broken over the decades. it didn't take a short time to do. it was years and years and years of protests and of defiance. here's a life that is remarkable. started in 1918 at the end of the first world war. let's take a
CNN
Dec 1, 2013 4:00pm PST
for one-to-one support and education. >>> i could see the stain on the river bank. i could see them pull my body to the shore. i could see them start cpr. i had no pulse. and i wasn't breathing. one fellow is yelling at me to come back. >> you were unconscious, so how do you know that all of this was happening? >> i felt my body break free. and i felt my spirit break free. and i was greeted by these people or these spirits. i could be with them and be going down this incredible pathway. and simultaneously look back at the river. when i saw my body, i will say that was the first time that i actually thought, well, i guess i am dead. i guess i really did die. >> in the book you write about dancing with them. were you celebrate sfg. >> yes. >> what? what were you celebrating? you just died. >> it was a great homecoming. and i was really surprised by the fact that i had no intention of going back. >> you didn't want it return? >> no. and i had all the reasons to return. i had a great life. i had a great job. i had a great husband. my children are wonderful and i love them more than i can eve
CNN
Dec 1, 2013 7:00pm PST
crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ] aflac. [ sassily ] aflac. uh huh. [ under his breath ] i am so fired. you're on in 5, duck. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash. find out more at aflac.com. [ chicken caws ] [ male announcer ] when your favorite food starts a fight, fight back fast with tums. heartburn relief that neutralizes acid on contact and goes to work in seconds. ♪ tum, tum tum tum tums! >>> i could see the stain on the river bank. i could see them pull my body to the shore. i could see them start cpr. i had no pulse. and i wasn't breathing. one fellow is yelling at me to come back. >> you were unconscious, so how do you know that all of this was happening? >> i felt my body break free. and i
CNN
Dec 2, 2013 2:00am PST
are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >>> a train flies off the tracks in new york killing four, injuring dozens. harrowing tales from survivors. the question this morning -- what went so wrong? we are live with the latest on the investigation. >>> the white house's deadline to fix the obama care website has passed but have the technical problems been fixed? what the obama administration is saying and what still needs to be done. >>> fury in the streets as thousand riot in ukraine and threatening to overcome that government. is revolution in the air? we are live. >>> welcome back to "early start." quite a situation there. i'm john berman. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. nice to have you with us this morning. >>> the ntsb investigators have recovered on so-called event recorders from a metro north commute train. that may help determine the cause of the deadly derailment in new
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Dec 2, 2013 7:00pm PST
, health care and education to all citizens. what has been happening the last five years? exactly what this 3457b claims to want. >> i just read a great book by a guy named john mackey who founded whole foods called conscious capitalism. he says the same thing as the pope. he says we all have to eat to live. but that doesn't mean we live just to eat. we all think we have a higher purpose and that in business, business can't exist without profit but does that mean that business only exists to profit? why do we all work? we work to take care of those we love and provide a little security and to make the best we can out of ourselves. that's what the pope is saying. this is not an anticapitalist creed. the pope reinforced the principle of catholic, the idea that you push -- >> but with that term, social justice raises red flags. >> the term "social justice" has been used to justify big, dumb, top-down government that has ruined a lot of people, a welfare system -- one of the causes of inequality, it's not the unbridled capitalism it's the end of the american family that started in the earl
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Dec 2, 2013 10:00pm PST
for a long time. >> the fact that you and other young people received the education, maybe they had it in school and know about safe sex, they're still getting infected. how do you overcome that and stop it? >> well, that is the challenge, because they think nothing can happen to them. at the end of our day in our community we have to start accepting those who are gay in our family. it is like my son, e. j. came out. it is important that cookie and i support our son, we're going to support him 100%. but we're in the minorities in this. in the black community, young gay men or young ladies who are lesbian, they're afraid to tell their parents. >> you mentioned your son. and you have been incredibly supportive of your son when it was publicly known he was gay, you just made a really moving statement of support with you and your wife. in terms of parents having the conversation about hiv/aids with their kids, is that a conversation that you and your wife had your sons early on? >> yes, that is what happened, i had to tell them early on how i got hiv. if they're going to have sex later
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Dec 4, 2013 10:00am PST
in that shooting. six educators, adults were killed. you're in touch with the families. a year later, how are they doing? >> well, i think you know, i would be reluctant to speak for and declare anyone exactly what exactly is happening for any individual families, but i think what i say about newtown is in fact, i've been recently quoting some lyrics from leonard cohen that there's a crack income everything. but that's how the light gets in. and i think newtown we're cracked. you know? this has affected all of us very deeply and especially our families that lost loved ones. and so we're cracked. but also out of that, those cracks we see light that is both coming inning to people's lives and also being shared by people's lives. we think that the story for many of our families as well as many of the citizens can of new town is that we are finding ways to be kind to each other, to encourage each other. finding ways to make a difference out of the circumstances wiljust were beyond imagination for most of us. and i think there's a real power there. but day by day, you know, it's one step at a
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Dec 4, 2013 4:00pm PST
lanza killed 20 children and six educators at sandy hook elementary school. this will be the first time you will hear these tapes on cnn. i can tell you we came to this decision after hours of discussion and consideration of the context of the news. afterwards, we'll hear from a former congressman who had been tasked with finding a way to better protect our children. but first, this report from deborah. we should warn you, what you're about to hear could be disturbing. >> reporter: the first call came from the school secretary moments after class started. it gives insight into how quickly adam lanza was able to get into the secured building. >> what's the location of the emergency? >> i think there is somebody shooting in here. in sandy hook school. >> what makes you think that? >> because somebody has a gun. i saw glimpse of somebody running down hallway. they're still running. they're still shooting. sandy hook school please. >> seven 911 calls were released. they captured the fear and quiet urgency and lack of panic of those inside and at the police dispatch. one woman shot in the fo
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Dec 4, 2013 9:00pm PST
was looking into further education for adam into washington. they were waiting to hear back. no inclination that anything was wrong or not right. >> she lot of her as well that day. nothing can compare to the horror suffered by the other families. what do you as a member of the lanza family, what would you say to the families who lost their children that day? >> my heart goes out to each and every family who has lot of a child. personally i lot of two sons and i know what you feel and i know what you feel five years from now and ten year from now. it's getting to the point of moving on from day to day, one foot in front of the other and you will make it and become stronger because of it. you will never know why. you can't dwell on the bad times. you will get through and endure. if you can help someone else, that's part of the healing process. the ability to talk about it. if you won't talk, you won't heal. you can't stuff it. >> your husband, i believe has been in contact with adam lanza's father. does he have insight into how he happy coping? >> like any of us, it has been a real trial. my
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Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm PST
was one of the lucky few to get a formal education. it was also among these hills the young man experienced african democracy first hand. he listened to council chiefs and elders debating issues for hours until they reached consensus on an issue. the traditional leader says this vital lesson influenced mandela years later as president when he helped shape south africa's modern democracy and reconciled blacks and whites. >> he has struggled both with the african and the balancing act that has been worked upon through mandela's leadership to insure that it ends in a peaceful and free country. >> reporter: in his 20s, mandela left rural life for johannesburg where he studied law and soon rose to political prominence but he was always proud of his heritage and he appeared in court wearing traditional robes at the trial in 1964. it was a healing moment when his father's chieftanship was returned to the family in 2007 and handed to mandela's grandson mandola. he says family and planned history is pivotal to his grntd father's identity. >> we would like to tell the story of the mandela
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Dec 6, 2013 11:00am PST
college classrooms and secondary education will sanitize a little bit of nelson mandela's story, not tell the full picture. >> i hope not. i hope the college professors and administrators will insist we tell the whole story. we don't have to idolize nelson mandela. we can present him as the ful - fully-fleshed human being with all his noble qualities and his flaws. i think the interesting thing that he illustrates is moral leaders often go to places that are unlikely, and unexpected. they develop relationships. they initiate conversations. that upset the equilibrium in order to produce justice, in order to catalyze change. i think that's what today's millennials can college students around the country are interested in. authentic leaders who keep it real. >> talk about upsetting people. julian, back to you, talking about during the bush administration in 2003 when nelson mandela made the statement in regard to the iraq war. as he said, president bush has romanticized justifications as far as why the u.s. was involved. he said, all he, being president bush, all he wants is iraq oil. so ho
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Dec 6, 2013 4:00pm PST
that can have the education and provide the lifestyle that they need to have. but he chose, god chose him to go to that country. to do something. from the comments that we received from the children, and the students and the people that knew him, his goal was accomplished. did he touch people's lives. he did make life different for all the people that he touched. not only here in america but also in libya. >> his family was already back in the u.s. when this happened. do you know how they're doing? >> i'm sure they're shocked and disbelief. i believe the church will have a special service on sunday where his wife and his son will be present there at the church. it will be very touching. because we loved him. and he had the greatest hug, the biggest smile ever. and his life was like he played tennis. no matter he was 6-0, he would run people that played him against him. he was challenged and always come up the best that he could on the tennis court and off the tennis court. i think that's the life he led and the life he wanted to continue living. even in a dangerous situation. >> we feel s
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Dec 7, 2013 2:00am PST
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. you know, ronny... folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. and how happy are they jimmy? i'd say happier than a bodybuilder directing traffic. he does look happy. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. for atrust bufferin, the only non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain reliever formulated with special buffers so it's gentler to your stomach. >>> i could see the stain on the riverbank. i could see them pull my body to the shore. i could see them start cpr. i had no pulse and i wasn't breathing. >> you were unconscious so how do you know that all of this was happening? >> i felt my body break free. and i felt my spirit break free. and i was greeted by these people or these spirits. i could be with them and be going down this incredible pathway and simultaneously look back at the river. when i saw my body, i will say that was the first time that i actually thought, well, i guess i am dead. i guess i really did die. >> you came face to face wit
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Dec 6, 2013 3:00am PST
work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >>> welcome back to a special edition of "new day." we start again, of course, with the passing of nelson mandela. you're looking at live pictures down in south africa. the news is sad to be sure but it is also definitely reason for celebration, because of the life and legacy of nelson mandela. people have been gathering outside his house. you will hear now singing, chanting, because remember, the greatest example of nelson mandela was the epitome of learning how to have joy in your heart even through the greatest of adversity. that's what we're seeing in south africa being echoed around the world and continuing to grow as word spreads of the passing of this great leader. we have arwa damon there outside the celebration. what's the latest from there, arwa? >> reporter: it's quite incredible to be out h
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Dec 2, 2013 9:00am PST
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. and our giant idaho potato truck is still missing. so my dog and i we're going to go find it. it's out there somewhere spreading the good word about idaho potatoes and raising money for meals on wheels. but we'd really like our truck back, so if you see it, let us know, would you? thanks. what? you give them the giggles. tylenol cold® helps relieve your worst cold and flu symptoms. but for everything we do, we know you do so much more. tylenol cold®. some airline passengers who flew us airways express from austin, texas, to phoenix, arizona, on saturday say they're being urged to get tested for tb. a man hon was thought to have active tuberculosis was reportedly taken off the flight before it reached the gate. this was at sky harbor airport. now, the cdc says "no infectious disease has been confirmed." we're going to having a conversation how much of a risk was it is next on "cnn newsroom." to glasgow, scotland. air accident investigators say the police helicopter that crashed into a busy pub over the weekend did not issue
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Dec 2, 2013 10:00am PST
but food is medicine. we could advise people and educate people what that means. we're starting to make real dents, impact in terms of a healthier america. this idea overall it's not just about playing defense and swatting at flies and believing we are preordained to heart disease and diabetes. i was that way, too. instead, it's this idea we can't optimize ourselves and we are nowhere near that right now. none of the other stuff, would unless we focus on some of that. that's within us. that's what i meant by that. >> that's a good point. all of these points are excellent points. i want viewers to go to cnn.com, read the entire article and learn important ob potentially life-saving information. thanks very much. >>> so forget the crowds and the brawls at the stores. today, the focus shifts to online shopping. i want to tell you which retailers are pinning their hopes on a big cyber monday. and she's not exactly tidy. even if she gets a stain she'll wear it for a week straight. so i use tide to get out those week old stains and downy to get it fresh and soft. since i'm the one who has to
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Dec 2, 2013 1:00pm PST
crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. stick with innovation. stick with power. stick with technology. get the new flexcare platinum from philips sonicare and save now. philips sonicare. [ female announcer ] gold bond intensive hand cream. now my hands look great. [ female announcer ] gold bond intensive hand cream. this stuff really works! >>> welcome back to the sports lead. it is pretty obvious what the sports lead is. it is hard to ignore what many people are calling the greatest college football game ever played. auburn's stunning, really unheard of walk-off win over its bitter rival, number one, alabama, formerly number one, alabama. you get a true sense of the agony and the ecstasy through the play by play guys. they probably think they've seen it all and they probably pretty much did, until this weekend. first, here's the play as the crimson tide's broadcasters saw it. >> 57 yards to win the iron bowl. he spots it, kick on the way. it's got length. it is sailing. it is short. it is grabbed about eight yards deep in the e
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Dec 3, 2013 9:00am PST
and create situations in which we push not just the children, but the educators who surround them. too many of us are too comfortable with mediocrity. as a result, as michele said, the rest of the world is moving forward. we haven't dropped. we're just losing in a race because we're not moving forward. >> look, i could talk about this all day. i think it's a fascinating discussion. going be a real talker around the country. steve perry, michelle rhee, thank you so much. maybe we'll do this again and have more, expand on this. it's important stuff. >> talk about the future of the countries. yeah. >> thanks so much to both of you. >>> now, for some other news making headlines right now, let's take a look. hong kong is on high alert today worried about a possible outbreak of avian flu. >> you don't want to hear this. a 36-year-old indonesian domestic worker was taken to hospital after contracting the virus in critical condition from what we're told at the moment. the country has escalated the response level plan. and here's why. >> the world health organization says in the past ten years, 651
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